Sunday, November 16, 2014

The Scholar's Grove - Balor or Balar in Irish Mythology


The Scholar's Grove, our new Academia  sharing project .

Articles thesis and more from young and old scholars that have been so kind to offer their efforts as (free) PDF downloads on the World Wide Web. Covering most often historic events myths legends tales poems and Dindsenchas  /  Seanchaithe .
 That we feel would be of interest to Pagans Heathens and Druid.


We will try and keep a one subject per blog often starting with a bit from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia to set our stage.

As we add new article links and comments we will be using the push down stack approach where newest article is on top just under this introduction to project.  We also will switching Blogs / subjects back and forth to try and keep things interesting. please leave any comments on the thread announcing each new shared article.

Yes you will have to use the download link for each PDF yourself for many reasons.

As we add new article links and comments we will be using the push down stack approach where newest article is on top just under this introduction to project.  We also will switching Blogs / subjects back and forth to try and keep things interesting. please leave any comments on the thread announcing each new shared article.

A yes you will have to use the download link for each PDF yourself for many reasons.

PS
If you see an ad with blog and click on it, it puts a few pennies in the Feed the Cats Kiddy! Which we really need.
TDK

Subject: Balor

>> In Irish mythology, Balor (modern spelling: Balar) was king of the Fomorians, a group of supernatural beings. He is often described as a giant with a large eye in his forehead that wreaks destruction when opened. He has been interpreted as a god or personification of drought and blight. <<
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balor
PS the whole Wiki is worth a read first!




The ARTICLES:

1)
Oral Tradition, 7/1 (1992):143-149
The Combat of Lug and Balor:
Discourses of Power in Irish Myth and Folktale

By Joan N. Radner
http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/articles/7i/10_radner.pdf





References:

Old Irish and other Terms I have used .
http://hoodoo-vodou-druido-grove.blogspot.com/2014/03/old-irish-terms-i-have-used.html

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

What is Druid Today ?



Of Course each has Her His or their Orders's own definitions.

Some have one that is fuzzy and in a fog.

Others Crystal Clear and diamond hard.

Few Druids agree on much at all.

So should you find mine harsh.

Fear not at all.

Walk your way.

Live your day.

Your own sweet way.


For me, an old and Unreformed Techno-Druid.

This is what I feel mine should be.




One whose's Heart beats always to the song of Pagan Pagus.

One who walks with the old Gods and Goddesses in respectful Ghosti yet fearless

One who walks in Gwynfyd with the Gwynfydolion yet serves in Midgard.

One that carries their burden Geasa with wisdom and will.

One that walks in good Ghosti with all of nature and they are 
Anam Cara to each other.

One that wields the  slat an draoichta and Ár nDraíocht Féin without fear yet to the greater good even if it calls harm to those that need control.




One that acts in true Ghosti Host yet is the ever reclusive Ollamh Fodhla to the children of Humanity.

And last one the walks the ancient ways of the ley and soul is ever stained with the tannen with spirit and wisdom of the Great Oak.

TDK / The Druid King 


References:

1) http://thedruidking.blogspot.com/2011/10/what-is-pagan-druids-view.html

2) http://hoodoo-vodou-druido-grove.blogspot.com/2014/03/old-irish-terms-i-have-used.html


PS
If you see an ad with blog and click on it, it puts a few pennies in the Feed the Cats Kiddy! Which we really need.
TDK




In the Runic Year of 2264


Copyright 11-11-2014 by George King


Sunday, November 9, 2014

The Scholar's Grove - Balor or Balar in Irish Mythology


The Scholar's Grove, our new Academia  sharing project .

Articles thesis and more from young and old scholars that have been so kind to offer their efforts as (free) PDF downloads on the World Wide Web. Covering most often historic events myths legends tales poems and Dindsenchas  /  Seanchaithe .
 That we feel would be of interest to Pagans Heathens and Druid.


We will try and keep a one subject per blog often starting with a bit from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia to set our stage.

As we add new article links and comments we will be using the push down stack approach where newest article is on top just under this introduction to project.  We also will switching Blogs / subjects back and forth to try and keep things interesting. please leave any comments on the thread announcing each new shared article.

Yes you will have to use the download link for each PDF yourself for many reasons.

As we add new article links and comments we will be using the push down stack approach where newest article is on top just under this introduction to project.  We also will switching Blogs / subjects back and forth to try and keep things interesting. please leave any comments on the thread announcing each new shared article.

A yes you will have to use the download link for each PDF yourself for many reasons.

PS
If you see an ad with blog and click on it, it puts a few pennies in the Feed the Cats Kiddy! Which we really need.
TDK

Subject: Balor

>> In Irish mythology, Balor (modern spelling: Balar) was king of the Fomorians, a group of supernatural beings. He is often described as a giant with a large eye in his forehead that wreaks destruction when opened. He has been interpreted as a god or personification of drought and blight. <<
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balor
PS the whole Wiki is worth a read first!




The ARTICLES:

1)
Oral Tradition, 7/1 (1992):143-149
The Combat of Lug and Balor:
Discourses of Power in Irish Myth and Folktale

By Joan N. Radner
http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/articles/7i/10_radner.pdf





References:

Old Irish and other Terms I have used .
http://hoodoo-vodou-druido-grove.blogspot.com/2014/03/old-irish-terms-i-have-used.html

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Adders Snakes and Druids




Adders Snakes and Druids:
Adders Snakes and Druids:

You will hear (read) at times me and other Druids refer to themselves or ancient Druids as Adders (a kind of Snake).

There are many references to Snakes and old Celtic Gods and Goddesses, also Druids having a special relationship with them. I will only go into one here that I often use. As it seems many Neo Druids still have the Christian phobia of snakes even as they walk the Druid's Woods.

>> Ref 1 In a poem of Taliessin, translated by Davies, in his Appendix No. 6, is the following enumeration of a Druid's

"I am a Druid; I am an architect; I am a prophet; I am a serpent" (Gnadr).From the word "Gnadr" is derived "adder," the name of a species of snake. Gnadr was probably pronounced like "adder" with a nasal aspirate.

 “Ophiolatreia” is a interesting read and has a section on Druids and their special relationships to snakes.

“Ophiolatreia”The Rites and mysteries connected with the origin, rise, and development of serpent worship in various parts of the world, enriched with interesting traditions, and a full description of the celebrated serpent mounds & temples, the whole forming an exposition of one of the phases of phallic, or sex worship.|By (Anonymous) [1889]


Here is a free Download link to it!http://archive.org/details/ophiolatreiaacco00nppr


Moon Rising

TDK

The "Beyond Weird" Celtic Books and Tales Download List




The "Beyond Weird" Celtic Books and Tales List


http://www.beyondweird.com/magick/neu/celt/index.htm A very nice place


Beyond Weird

 Legends and Sagas  England Ireland  Wales  Scotland  Brittany  Manx  Fairies  General  Links Some of these books and texts are translations of Celtic legends and sagas; others are retellings of the material, folklore, or literary works based on Celtic themes. During the 19th and early 20th Century there was a resurgence of interest in the folklore of Ireland, Wales and Scotland. This was reflected in a huge amount of literature based on the rich Celtic mythopoetic heritage, most of it very faithful to the original material, some in a more modern voice.A good number of these files were originally scanned by Phillip Brown for his (now defunct) Celtic Folklore website. These are indicated by [PB].Celtic Midi files Music to listen to while you read Celtic folklore.IrelandThe Voyage of Branby Meyer Kuno [1895]Old Irish saga of a voyage to the pagan Celtic otherworld, with parallel English and Gaelic. The Second Battle of Mag Tuired (Cath Maige Tuired) This Irish saga, first written down in the ninth Century A.D. is an account of the epic battle between the mythical Tuatha De Danann and Fomoire for Ireland. It has deep roots in Indo-European mythology, told with Homeric grace and bawdy humor. There are many allusions to ancient pre-Christian Celtic traditions. The Cattle-Raid of Cooley (Táin Bó Cúailnge) The Cattle-Raid of Cooley is the central epic of the Ulster cycle. It tells of the great Irish hero, Cuchulain of Ulster, and his battle against the forces of Queen Medb of Connaught. The Destruction of Dá Derga's HostelTranslated by Whitely Stokes [1910] Heroic Romances of Ireland (2 Vols.). by A. H. Leahy [1905-6]Includes the Courtship of Etain, the Boar of Mac Datho, the Sickbed of Cuchulain, and the five "Tains" or Cattle-Forays, including the bizarre Tain bo Regamna, The Apparition of The Great Queen to Cuchulain. This etext has been submitted to Project Gutenberg.Lady Augusta Gregory was a close collaborator with W.B. Yeats, the Irish poet and mystic. These three books are her retellings of Irish mythology and folklore, and are among the best of the genre. Cuchulain of Muirthemne by Lady Gregory [1902] [PB] Gods and Fighting Men by Lady Gregory [1904] [PB] A Book of Saints and Wonders by Lady Gregory [1906] [PB] Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland by Lady Gregory [1920] [PB] Yeats IndexFairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry    Edited and Selected by W. B. Yeats [1888] The Celtic Twilight by W.B. Yeats [1893 and 1902]   This short book of essays by Yeats is a must-read. In The Seven Woods by W. B. Yeats [1903]   This is a short book of poetry and a play by Yeats on Irish mythological themes. Later Poems by W. B. Yeats [1922]   Some of Yeats' best known poetry. Legends and Stories of Ireland by Samuel Lover [1831, 1834] [PB]   An early 19th century collection of comic Irish short stories. The Irish Sketch-book by William Makepeace Thackeray [1845] [PB]   A travelogue of Ireland of the 1840s, not much in the way of folklore, but good background information. Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland by Lady Francesca Speranza Wilde [1887] [PB]   A volumnious collection of Irish folklore, including folk magic, not all of it authoritative. Myths and Folklore of Ireland by Jeremiah Curtin [1890] [PB] Legendary Fictions of the Irish Celts by Patrick Kennedy [1891] [PB]   A huge collection of Irish folklore and legends, up through Christian times. The Aran Islands by John M. Synge [1907] [PB]   A travelogue of the Aran Islands with beautiful woodcut illustrations. Celtic Wonder Tales by Ella Young [1910] [PB] Beside the Fire by Douglas Hyde [1910] [PB]   A scholarly collection of Irish folk stories. The Preface of this book reviews many of the books included on this page. The Crock of Gold by James Stephens [1912] [PB]   This is a novel based on Irish folklore. In Wicklow and West Kerry by John M. Synge [1912] [PB]   A travelogue of rural Ireland at the turn of the 19th Century The King of Ireland's Son by Padraic Colum [1916] [PB] The Druid Path by Marah Ellis Ryan [1917]   This is a collection of short stories set in ancient and modern Ireland by an American author. The Candle of Vision by AE (George William Russell) [1918]Essays on Celtic mysticism. Irish Fairy Tales by James Stephens [1920] [PB] WalesThe Mabinogion Lady Charlotte Guest, tr. [1877]   The Mabinogion is a group of Welsh tales from the Red Book of Hergest, a 14th Century manuscript maintained at Jesus College, Oxford. The Four Ancient Books of Walesby William F. Skene [1868]This is the only available translation of the complete corpus of Welsh Bardic poetry. Prolegomena to the Study of Old Welsh Poetryby Edward Anwyl [1903] The Gododdin Poems   from The Four Ancient Books of Wales by William F. Skene [1868] British Goblins by Wirt Sikes [1881] [PB]   Despite the title, this book is actually a study of Welsh fairy folklore. The Welsh Fairy Book by W. Jenkyn Thomas [1907] [PB]   A collection of Welsh legends and folktales for young readers. Celtic Folklore: Welsh and Manx By John Rhys [1900] [PB] The Barddas of Iolo Morganwg, Vol. I [1862]The Barddas of Iolo Morganwg, Vol. II [1874]J. Williams Ab Ithel (editor) Vol. I [1862]A visionary reconstruction of the Druidic and Bardic tradition, which had a huge influence on the modern Celtic and neo-Pagan revival. Or a notorious forgery, you decide...ScotlandCarmina Gadelica, Volume ICarmina Gadelica, Volume IIby Alexander Carmicheal [1900].Prayers, invocations, blessings and charms, in English and Gaelic, from the Western Isles of Scotland. The English and Scottish Popular Ballads by Francis James Child [1882-1898].This is the motherlode of ballad collections, including many variations on each ballad. Popular Tales of the West Highlands by J. F. Campbell. [1890]This is a four-volume comprehensive sourcebook of Scottish folklore. The Poems of Ossian by James Macpherson [1773] Scottish Fairy and Folk Tales by Sir George Douglas [1773] Wonder Tales from Scottish Myth and Legend by Donald Alexander Mackenzie [1917] Notes on the Folk-Lore of the North-East of Scotland by Walter Gregor [1881] BrittanyLegends and Romances of Brittany by Lewis Spence [1917]Folk Tales of Brittany by Elsie Masson [1929, Copyright not renewed]ManxThe Phynodderree and Other Legends of the Isle of Man by Edward Callow [1882] The Folk-Lore of the Isle of Man by A.W. Moore [1891] Traces of the Norse Mythology in the Isle of Man by P.M.C. Kermode [1904] Celtic FairiesThese are texts and studies about Celtic fairies, elves, and other supernatural creatures (as opposed to fairytales, which are a different matter altogether). Some of the books listed here are listed elsewhere on this page.The Secret Common-Wealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies By Robert Kirk, 'Comment' by Andrew Lang [1893]   This monograph, originally written in 1691, is a classic of Scottish fairy folklore, and this etext was scanned from a very rare first printing of the Lang edition. Fairy Legends and Traditions by Thomas Crofton Croker [1825] [PB] A Peep at the Pixies by Anna Eliza Bray; Illustrations by Hablot K. Browne [1854]. [PB] The Fairy Mythology by Thomas Keightley [1870]. [PB] British Goblins by Wirt Sikes [1881] [PB]   Despite the title, this book is actually a study of Welsh fairy folklore. The Phynodderree and Other Legends of the Isle of Man by Edward Callow [1882] Tales of the Dartmoor Pixies by William Crossing [1890]. [PB] The Science of Fairy Tales by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1891]. [PB] Tales of Fairies and of the Ghost World by Jeremiah Curtin [1895] [PB] The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries by W.Y. Evans-Wentz [1911] [PB]   This is a serious study of Fairy folklore and mythology, with an ethnographic approach. This was the first book by Evans-Wentz, who later went on to translate many of the books of Tibetean Buddhism. Fairies by Gertrude M. Faulding [1913]. [PB] The Coming of the Fairies by Arthur Conan Doyle [1922]A study of the famous Cottingley fairy photographs, by the creator of Sherlock Holmes. General StudiesCeltic Myth and Legend by Charles Squire [1905]A comprehensive treatment of Irish, Welsh, and British mythology, from the ancient pagan pantheons up to the Arthurian legends. The Religion of the Ancient Celts by J. A. MacCulloch [1911] Celtic Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs [1892] [PB] More Celtic Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs [1894] [PB] Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race by Thomas Rolleston [1911] [PB] On the Study of Celtic Literature by Matthew Arnold [1867] [PB] A Book of Folklore by Sabine Baring-Gould [1913] [PB] Tom Tit Tot, An Essay on Savage Philosophy in Folk-Tale by Edward Clodd [1898] [PB] 

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Internet Sacred Text Archive



The largest freely available archive of online books about religion, mythology, folklore and the esoteric on the Internet. The site is dedicated to religious tolerance and scholarship, and has the largest readership of any similar site on the web.

Over 1700 Books !!!



Door To:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/

Note some files are downloadable. PS yes I would love a gift of the sites Flash Drive!!!

THE ACADEMY FOR ANCIENT TEXTS



>>The sole purpose of this website is to provide the largest on-line library of ancient texts in the world. This includes, but is not limited to, religious, metaphysical, mythological, philosophical, and historical texts.
Currently, there are many websites on the web that contain specialized ancient texts such as www.sacred-texts.com . It is my dream that these texts, which are in the public domain, can all be brought together in one place so you, the reader, can easily get the material you're seeking. It is a massive undertaking, one that will undoubtedly take many years to complete. Besides compiling what's readily available, there is still much work to be done in translating and transcribing those texts which are still housed in libraries such as the S.Liddell MacGregor Matthews library, and L'Arsenal de Bibliotheque in Paris, France. We hope to be able to send a team of translators to such places to continue the work, there.

We have several hundred texts and documents waiting to be coded. There's just a smattering of texts, online, at the moment, (about 2,000). Many of these texts have been transcribed, scanned, and formatted by www.sacred-texts.com as well as many others whose links you will find at the tops of various pages. I am extremely thankful that these people have been kind enough to present their work to the public for non-commercial use, and to those who have allowed us to use their copyrighted material. If you would like to contribute e-texts to us, or have comments about the site, please write to us at texts@ancienttexts.org.<<


Door to:

Table of Contents

Also see:The Latin Library Over 2000 texts in Latin.


Adapa and the Food of Life
The Adventures of Art son of Conn
The Adventure of the Churlish Clown in the Grey-Drab Coat
The Adventures of Connla
The Adventures of Nera, or, the Cattle-Raid of Angen
The Adventures of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon
Alcibiades 1
Apology
Arthur and the Eagle
Ath Cliath Cualann: Dublin
The Auguries of the Year


The Battle of Cen Abrad
The Battle of Magh Mucrama
The Battle of the Trees
Beowulf
The Beheading of John the Baptist by Mogh Ruith
Bend Boirche
Bile Tortan
Bhagavad Gita
The Birth of Aedh Slaine
The Birth of Conchobhar
The Birth of Cormac, Version 2
The Birth of Cú Chulainn
The Black Book of Carmarthen
Boand: the Boyne River
The Book of Aneurin
The Book of Enoch
The Book of Invasions: Irish Texts Society
The Book of Taliesin
The Book of Invasions: The Book of Leinster Version
The Boyhood Deeds of CuChulainn (Hull,Eleanor,Standish Hayes O' Grady trans.,The Cuchullin Saga,(London 1898),pp.135-154.)
The Boyhood Deeds of Cú Chulainn (Tom Cross and Harris Slover. NY: Barnes and Noble, 1996. reprint.)
The Boyhood Deeds of Fionn
The Boyhood Deeds of Fionn
Branwen Daughter of Llyr
Brugh na Bóinne: Newgrange

Carn Mail
The Cattle-Raid of Fraech
The Cattle-Raid of Regamna
The Cattle-Raid of Regamon
The Cause of the Battle of Cnucha
Celibe
Charmides
The Code of Hammurabi
Cnogba: Knowth
The Colloquy of the Two Sages
Corpus Hermetica
Cratylus
Critias
Crith Gabhlach: An Early Legal Poem
Crito
Culhwch and Olwen


The Death of Celtchar
The Death of Conchobar
The Death of Cormac mac Airt
The Death of Cuchulain
The Death of Crimthann
The Death of Cynddylan
The Death of Dermot
The Death of Drudwas
The Death of Fionn
The Death of Maelgwn Gwynedd,
The Death of Muircertach mac Erca
The Death of Niall of the Nine Hostages
The Debility of the Ulstermen
The Descent of Ishtar Into the Lower World
The Descent of the Men of the North
The Destruction of Dind Rig
The Disappearance of Caenchomrac
The Dream of Maxen
The Dream of Oengus
The Dream of Rhonabwy
The Driving of Flidais' Cattle
The Drowning of the Bottom Hundred
Dubad: Dowth


Egyptian Book of the Dead(The Book of Coming Forth)
Emerald Tablet
The Enchanted Cave of Keshcorran
EnumaElish
The Enumeration of Finn's People
Eo Rossa, Eo Mugna
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Executioner of John the Baptist


The Fairy-Palace of the Rowan Trees
The Fate of the Children of Lir
The Fate of the Children of Turenn
Finn and the Man in the Tree
The Five Munsters
The Fosterage of the House of Two Milk-pails
The Frenzy of Conn


Gereint and Enid
Gorgias
Grianan an Aileach


The Heroic Birth of Cormac, Version 1
The Hiding of the Hill of Howth
How Finn Found Knowledge
How Ronan Slew His Son
The Hills of Tlachtga
The History of Taliesin
The History of Peredur


The Instructions of King Cormac
Ion


The Juvencus Englynion


King March's Ears
King Urien and Modron


Laches
Laeghaire mac Crimthann’s visit to the fairy realm
Lebor Gabala Errin(Book of Invasions)Lesser Hippias
The Life of St. Kieran
The Little Brawl at the Hill of Almhain
Lludd and Lleuelys
Lysis


Mabinogion
Magh Sleacht: The Plain of Adoration, or, Cromh Cruach
Melwas and Gwenhyvar Version One
Melwas and Gwenhyfer Version Two
Manawyddan son of Llyr
Math son of Mathonwy
Mide Myrddin Wyllt

Nas
The North Britain Triads
Nynniaw and Peibaw


The Ode of the Months
The Ogham Tract from the Leabhar Baile an Mhota The Tract on the Kingship of Ireland
Cormac's Glossary
The Fitness of Names
On the Loss of a Pet GooseThe Heavy Hosting of Guaire
Owain, or, the Lady of the Fountain


The Panegyric of Cormac mac Airt and the Death of Finn
The Peniarth 54 Triads The Phantom Chariot of Cú Chulainn
The Phantom's Frenzy, or, the Vision of Conn the Hundred-Fighter
Pwyll Lord of Dyfed


The Quarrel of Arthur and Huail, and the Death of Huail ap Caw
The Quarrel of Rhun ap Maelgwn and Elidir Mwynfawr
The Questions of Catwg the Wise


The Raid for Dartaid's Cattle
Rath Crinna
Rath Mor of Mag Line The Red Book of Hergest (including Guest's Mabinogion, the Triads, and poetry)
The Red Book of Hergest Triads Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
The Rule of Cormac mac Culennan


The Second Battle of Magh Turedh
Sephir Yetzirah
The Settling of the Manor of Tara
The Seven Evils
The Shadow-House of Lugh (poem)
Sinend: the Shannon River
The Shepherd of Myddfai
Slaine
St. Collen and Gwyn ap Nudd
The Stanza on Mabon ap Modron's Grave
The Stanza on Merlin's Grave
The Stanzas of Wise Sayings
The Story of Aedh Baclamh


Tailtiu: The Fair of Teltown
The Tale of Liban the Mermaid and the Death of Eochaid
The Tale of the Ordeals: Cormac's Adventures in the Land of PromiseTales of Mongan
Temhair: Tara Hill
The Testament of Morann
The Three Drinking-horns of Cormac ua Cuinn
The Tidings of Conchobar son of Ness
The Tidings of Moshaulum
Tlachtga
Tonn Clinda
The Tragic Death of Connla, or, the Death of Aoife's Only Son
The Tragic Death of Cu Roi mac Dairi
The Tragic Death of Fergus mac Leide
Treatise on the Emerald Tablet
Trystan and Esyllt
The Twenty-Four Knights of King Arthur's
Two Poems of Columbcille


Umall
Upanishads

The Voyage of Bran mac Febral;



The Wooing of Becfola
The Wooing of Emer
The Wooing of Etain




The Yew Tree of the Disputing Sons
and the Decision as to Cuchulain's Sword





Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Druids Demons Knowledge Currency Power



In  29 years working in Telecommunications with Siemens and Nokia. In ATE engineering at Sensormatic,  In Pulmonary Research at Mt Sinai Hospital (Miami Beach Fl.), At American District Telegraph, USMC (Vietnam 60's) Racal Milgo, Milgo Electronic  and many more companies.

A very clear message always played true. Knowledge and access to Knowledgeable people if carefully controlled misered, released mostly to those above your position was the real key to Power Success and Promotions.

It made no difference if you already possessed it or could just extract it from others. Those that played knowledge well gained, those that shared freely , often preemptively  and to the point of excess of a situations needs.  Lost on just stayed rooted where they were like a Cow on at Rope tied to the Sucker Tree.

It has been said that in the World of the Dominion of Demons, knowledge is coin of their Realm.

Clearly this is also true in the World of Business, Science, Industry and Politics.

So how does this fit the Druid's Woods you ask.  Clearly ancients Druids had the Knowledge of the Times. Used it well and shared with very few its sources and bounty.

Make those that would posses it learn the hard ways and join the very private circle or cast.
Forbid the blanket sharing of it but encouraged it selling on a Just in Time to paying Customer, Toutas, Kings or even the Gods.

And yes most of us bemoan the great loss by our ancient selves the pool of Druidic Knowledge, yet we must have been an active part of its protection and in the end, its final losses .

So today is our most open and giving ways also cause of our lack of great institutions,  successful and respected employment of our arcane crafts  and our Elders in Beggers Robes when older and heath or usefulness in societies other jobs turns its back on them?

Seems to me the Demons had it right along.  What say you ?


Moon Rising
Babel Risen

TDK / The Druid King


Copyright George King September 23, 2014


Thursday, September 18, 2014

My UPG Druidic Signs Greeting and Nemetonic Space Rituals





Here I will share some Formal and informal Hand signing greeting and creation of Nemetonic Space for Ritual or other uses.


Starting with the simple Greeting sign of first three fingers down in an Awen like sigil . Indicating one is a Druid and recognizes the gifts of Awen from Summerland and our ancient Oak,  Leys, Gods / Goddesses, Fae, our own ancestors and other Otherkin of our very ancient past.


A more Public version of arm and first three fingers up in a agreement sigil or recognizing our own Awen, work and duty to Greater Druidia, Gaia and Summerland.







This will seem fragmented until you read all of it.



---------------------------
Codes for Sigil positions:

ML: Mouth / Lips


LB: Left Breast or just above it.


RB: Right Breast or just above it.


BBPB: Between Belly Button and Pelvis Bone.

FH: Forehead

----------------------



IS / IS
I Seek / I Share

In I Seek, we will see movement LB to RB for I seek (Right brain hemisphere) to (Left brain hemisphere).
The I Seek can be seen also as the requestor or student mode.




In I Share, we will see movement RB to LB for I share (Left brain hemisphere) to (Right brain hemisphere).



The I Share the answerer or Teachers mode. Yet when two people meet they can use one or the other and then also reverse them.

-----------------------


Making a "Druid
(Hamarr) Mjölnir"  Hammer Sigil.


I Seek:

With flat of  Left Hand or Fist for more power. Place and move in this order.

1) BBPB


2) ML


3) LB


4) RB

5) ML


In these five movements you have formed the "Druid Hammer Sigil"



I Share:

With flat of  Right Hand or Fist for more power. Place and move in this order.

1) BBPB


2) ML


3) RB


4) LB

5) ML


In these five movements you have formed the "Druid Hammer Sigil"



Sacred Space and casting circles (if you use them).



In calling quarters for Nemetonic space I most often prefer Widdershins starting at:

The East with I Seek Sigil

Then North I Share Sigil

Then West I Seek Sigil

and ending South with I Share Sigil.


See Deosil or Widdershins Witch Way to Turn:
http://hoodoo-vodou-druido-grove.blogspot.com/2014/06/deosil-or-widdershins-witch-way-to-turn.html


Druid or Heathen Hammer Sigil:

The Normal Heathen , Bunor-Thor touching of FH is to me a "Law Met Tet" admission or God of the Head. While correct for Heathens that have Thor as their main or one of main Gods.

This is not so for most Druids and using the ML, speaks of Honor to 
Lady (Hamarr) Mjölnir and Gods Goddesses but not always subservient worship of them.



I look at using a sigil signing of Lady (Hamarr) Mjölnir in her most spiritual sense.that Wyrd (fate personified) and Orlog (fundamental law) are her Heads while Hamingja (Family Souls or Bloodlines) her fore-haf.  




Unverified personal gnosishttp://thedruidking.blogspot.com/2014/09/my-upg.html

UPG from Lady (Hamarr) Mjölnir's  Lullaby of the Gods.
http://druidinmidgard.blogspot.com/2014/09/lullaby-of-gods.html



Moon Rising 
Babel Risen

TDK . The Druid King.


Copyright George King September 18, 2014  Blog may be shared freely if in full.

Use in all Druidic Rituals of course is granted. GK

My UPG




The Wonderful advantages of "My UPG"

>>
Unverified personal gnosis (often abbreviated UPG) is the phenomenological concept that an individual's spiritual insights (or gnosis) may be valid for them without beinggeneralizable to the experience of others. It is primarily a neologism used in polytheistic reconstructionism, to differentiate it from ancient sources of spiritual practices.
<< R. 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unverified_personal_gnosis




I often write and share concepts or views that if there are "Historical verifiable References" I either  do not know them or bother to share them. Thereby letting the works fall under the category of "UPG"

This is in the  Neo-PHD "Pagan Heathen Druid" world a wonderful thing.

1) It allows the easy Use It or Lose It with out having nagging guilt that someone may know something very very old that you do not but perhaps feel you should. Thereby eliminating a reason to to attack it.

2) If it is UPG and I believe all that we create without direct knowledge of other available sources that we have been exposed to is UPG. Then the road to saying prove it is closed for good.

Yes you can agree or disagree with it , "Take it or Leave It". Even  show other sources that would indicate that this or that is or was not this or that way.

3) But if you expect there are other sources and the UPG was plagiarized, then that to adds perhaps value to it. Remembering we all almost have past lives, some form of Universal Psychic Mind and varying access to the Akashic Records Library. Do you still have your card?

So if you find something I share upsets you and I did not leave reference of others you can attack.
Will chalk it up to UPG, have a drink and feel free to send me some money for for scholarly research in the future. 







Moon Rising
Babel Risen
TDK / The Druid King




Tuesday, September 9, 2014

My Path when ask.




Old Un-Reformed Techno-Druid and Natural Witch.


 I most often Listen to the Spirit of the First Ancient Oak and Way the Ley across the veils of Time.

 I deal with all Otherkin on a two way Street or the Cross-Roads  

I am Friend to the Otherkins, Fae, dJinn the Loa and Most Gods and Goddesses, but respect their Time and Patience, with Human Kind and UnKind. 

And work in their service for my Price as did the Ancient Druids we once were, Also often Scroll for SummerLand.

TDK

I Believe, UPG and Dogma



Just a note of Observation.

First I am in no way a C.R. "Celtic Reconstructionist", yet I often admire most of their efforts.

Even so Good is where you find it and I would like to Borrow a Page from their ways.

By adding the simple two words (I Believe)  before stating any point of belief that comes across as an absolute fact. Goes a long way in keeping a Moot ot Cauldron's temperature from over heating or looking Dogmatic.

And yes I do fail to do this as often as I should. Sometimes UPG is best to use if one has had special contact but most often we are dealing with personal or even general public conclusions bested on ours or others interpretation of  observed Data.

>>Unverified personal gnosis (often abbreviated UPG) is the phenomenological concept that an individual's spiritual insights (or gnosis) may be valid for them <<

TDK

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Monotheistic Three Humped Camel tries get its Nose in the Pagan / Druid Tent.




From X

"As a druid I am learning that all gods are one god, and all goddesses are one goddess. So, all are One, just different aspects of that One. So, to me that means I worship in Monotheistic way. What do you think?""

MY View:

There are many forms of Druid beliefs and we hear this sort of statement  often in Pagan Circles.

But to me it is just a Trolled Meme pushed by Christians.

 Feeling either Guilty for playing Tithing Free Pagans or to intentionally  confuse a true understanding of what Ancient Druids and most Pagan paths knew and communicated directly with.in the past.

 That and these often poised as Gods or  Deities in historic references.

And as there are many definitions in the minds and hearts of Humans as to what is or is not a God Goddess or Deity, this allows the proverbial Monotheistic Humped Camel to get its Nose   in the Pagan / Druid Tent.

TDK  / The Druid King


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel's_nose

Thursday, July 24, 2014

ILL WINDS:



The depths of a Druii's True Roots like the great Oak or any tree in the forest of Life are really only tested when times are hard and resources scarce.

Or in the face of Strong and Ill winds of Adversity.

This too is true of real friendship among Men an Fae and on the Path which your true life you did lay.

TDK

(c) George King July 2014

Monday, July 14, 2014

Old Irish Celtic Chakra System







Most are familiar   with or have heard of the Vedic Chakra system.

The Celtic Irish also recorded a system that some feel service the same purpose of human development.

Let us perhaps take a closer view of "The Celtic Irish Chakra System"

As told in the wonder find  most often called " The Cauldron of Poesy"

A most worthy study foe any on their Druid path.


>> During the 7th century CE, an Irish fili or sacred poet composed a poem on one of the mysteries of the Irish wisdom tradition. This poem is preserved in a 16th century manuscript (1), along with the glosses in 11th century language explaining some of its more obscure references. When it was finally "discovered" by modern scholars, it was named "The Cauldron of Poesy" for its references to poetry being created in three internal cauldrons.<<


http://www.ancientmusic.co.uk/files/cauldron_of_poesy.pdf

Cauldron  pictured is:  The Gundestrup cauldron is a richly decorated silver vessel, thought to date between 200 BC and 300 AD,


This link has untranslated but there is a font error still may be useful.
http://www.seanet.com/~inisglas/cop1.html




TDK / The Druid King


Sunday, July 13, 2014

Of Groves and Moots






There are Groves and there are Moots.
A Moot is most often the place for general Druidic discussion, sharing and even learning.
A Grove is also for sharing and learning yet it is much more.

Closer to a Toutas (Tribe) than a Moot, a place of shelter caring and love for its members.
And this requires a deeper understanding of each of us, or needs, what has hurt or helped us and yes mutual protection when a member is under Psychic or heath attack.

So we must understand and accept the need and rights of our fellow Grove Druids to share their pain as well as joy. That is just the cost of being in a Grove instead of a Moot.

Yes there is a comment to each other even in a Face Book Virtual Grove.

Moon Rising
Babel Risen



TDK / The Druid King

Thursday, July 10, 2014

The Wise Oak:



Once on the Ley and old Druid. Way. Even the Acorn is a Druii.

Yet there are many stages Robes and chains to earn, before one owns "The Druid's Egg or Eye"

And In the last stage, Robe and Chain, the Wisdom on what Battles, Where, Why  and if taken on in sight of whose most Public Eye.

To take on is the Mark of Mature Druid Oak.

 Yet even Strong and Tall  Trees often fail gain this deep roots wisdom.




Moon Rising
Babel Risen


TDK / The Druid King
Post note:

How deep are your roots?


Saturday, June 28, 2014

The Three Illuminations` of the Filidh




Sorry for so many sites shared but each seems to add a bit more to the True picture of this interesting subject.  And yes I could have added even more but I think these old sites will wet the 
appetite if there is one.



Tenm Laida - `Illumination by Song


Dichetal do Chennaib - `Cracking open the nuts of Wisdom

`Imbas Forosna - `Sudden Illumination

Are the `Three Illuminations` of the Filidh, as described in the Irish vernacular texts. Here in I will try to give my interpretations of these techniques.

Tenm Laida
Illumination by Song

Tenm Laida is, IMHO, the easiest of the three techniques to perform. The way in which I use Tenm Laida is as a method to achieving that altered state of conciousness in which that other realm may be contacted. This state is acheived through the chanting or singing (or as many of us seem to be utilizing more shamanic techniques - drumming) a repetitive phrase or pattern, until the mind reaches a state of inner peace. It must be noted that this seems to be a universal practice, forms of it may be found in most native cultures. 
Whilst using this technique the Filidh would often prophecise in the form of spontaneously composed verse, (though I have to be honest and say I`ve very rarely achieved it!). 

        Dichetal do Chennaib
Cracking open the nuts of Wisdom

Describing how Dichetal do Chennaib worked it problematic. In the Senchus Mor it is translated as incantation from the ends (of fingers), or (of bones). Others translate it as inspired incantation or cracking open the nuts of wisdom. It could mean that the `poet` would compose a Ogham `spell` using the fingers to make the Ogham shapes. Alternately a  kind of Hand-Ogham may be been suggested, each Ogham used as a mnemonic to compose inspirational verse. What ever its form, it was the only technique that St.Patrick did not outlaw, because, unlike the others, it `contained no ritual`. 

        Imbas Forosna
        Sudden Illumination

Imbas Forosna, seems to me to be related to the Tabhfheis - `The Bulls Hide Trance`. Both involve the `poet` chewing on the raw meat of certain animals, both involve sensory derivation, (Tabhfheis beneath a bulls hide, Imbas Forosna within a darkened chamber) and both involved prophecy whilst in a trance-like state. In Imbas Forosna the `poet` would remain in the chamber for up to three days, and would then be brought out into the bright light, the sudden illumination causing spontaneous prophecy. Now the one thing I was always taught is never to shock someone out of  meditation, so I can`t recommend this at all. The Filidh were trained for up to twenty years in these techniques, we, as a rule, are not 
Text written by J.C.Melia. Obviously, I claim no to copyright!   Ref. http://www.oocities.org/athens/aegean/7779/illum1.htm


dichetal > spells and spellwork

Dichetal Do Chennaib   > (Cracking open the Nuts of Wisdom) is a state achieved by relaxation and clearing the mind in a Ritual environment. It usually involved using some Magickal implement such as a knife, a sword or a staff to touch a subject (usually upon the head) or involved the handling an item so that the diviner could discover what secret knowledge was contained within it. This information could be events from a person's past life, a detailed history of who and what had happened to an object or how and why the subject was being hexed or spelled. I know this sounds like ESP but it was enhanced through Ritual and relaxation techniques. I believe that Dichetal Do Chennaib is the proper state for performing Ogham divinations as well.
Ref. http://www.summerlands.com/crossroads/library/awenimba.htm



díchetal do chennaib

[OIr., extempore incantation (?)].
A kind of incantation or spell composed by poets (fili) and druids of early Ireland. Various early sources describe it as being composed extemporaneously, often using the finger-tips, which may imply divination. Commentators have suggested that díchetal do chennaib may have been a kind of clairvoyance or psychometry in which the seer conveys his message in quatrain or verse. The ollam was required to be proficient in both the díchetal do chennaib and the imbas forosnai. Fionn mac Cumhaill is described as being especially proficient at díchetal do chennaib. St Patrick allowed díchetal do chennaib to continue because it was judged harmless and did not involve pagan rites.
See also DIVINATION; TEINM LAÍDA; AWENYDDION.
From:  díchetal do chennaib   in  A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology »
Reference Entries
díchetal do chennaib
in A Dictionary of Celtic MythologyLength: 128 words  Ref, http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095716520



DICHETAL DO CHENNAIB (Cracking open the Nuts of Wisdom) is a state achieved by relaxation and clearing the mind in a Ritual environment. It usually involved using some sort of Magical implement such as a knife, a sword or staff. Sometimes they had to actually touch the subject (if alive, usually upon the head) or directly handle an item to discover what secret knowledge was contained within it. This information could be almost anything: events from a person's past life, a detailed history of who and what had happened to an object or even how and why the subject was bespelled or enchanted. A spontaneous flow of information and/or poetic verse might accompany the first contact that occured between the seer and the object. This verse would then be interpreted based upon the vast storehouse of knowledge that had been accumulated through years of study, experiment, observation and experience.  Ref. http://dichetaldochennaib.blogspot.com/





Dichetal do chennaib cnâime

Interpretation modify modify the code ]

The meaning of this mantra is uncertain what "sung prophecy" is an improvisation 1 .

Sources and references edit edit the code ]

Mythological tale:
  • The Roundup cows Cooley , Irish Celtic story translated from Irish, introduced and annotated by Alain Deniel, L'Harmattan, Paris, 1997 ISBN  2-7384-5250-7 ) .
  • Paul-Marie Duval , The Gods of Gaul , Paris, Editions Payot, February 1993, 169  p. ISBN  2-228-88621-1 )
    Increased reissue of a book originally published in 1957 in the PUF . Paul-Marie Duval distinguished Gallic Celtic mythology syncretism due to the Gallo-Roman civilization.
  • Albert Grenier , Gauls , Paris, Payot Small library, August 1994, 365  p. ISBN  2-228-88838-9 )
    Increased reissue of a book originally published in 1970. Albert Grenier says Indo-European origin, described their social organization, their culture and their religion by making the link with the island Celts.
  • Christian-J. Guyonvarc'h , Magic, medicine and divination among the Celts , Science Library Payot, Paris, 1997 ISBN  2-228-89112-6 ) .
  • Christian-J. Guyonvarc'h and Françoise Le Roux  :
    • Druids , West-France University, al.  "human memory: history", Rennes, 1986 ISBN  2-85882-920-9 )  ;
    • Celtic Civilisation , Ouest-France University, al. "human memory: history", Rennes, 1990 ISBN  2-7373-0297-8 )  ;
    • Celtic Festivals , Rennes, Ouest-France University, al. "human memory: history", April 1995, 216  . p ISBN  9782737313158 )
      Work devoted to four major religious festivals: Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane, Lughnasadh.
  • Philippe Jouët , The Sources of Celtic mythology , Yoran Embanner, Fouesnant, 2007 ISBN  9782914855372 ) .
  • Wenceslas Kruta , Celts, History and English Editions Robert Laffont, coll. "Mouthpieces", Paris, 2000 ISBN  2-7028-6261-6 ) .
  • Claude Sterckx , Celtic Mythology the world , Paris, Marabout, October 2009, 470  p. ISBN  978-2-501-05410-2 ).
  • See also the bibliography on Celtic mythology and literature on Celtic civilization .
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichetal_do_chennaib_cn%C3%A2ime




Moon Rising

TDK / The Druid King